Stem Cells, Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

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About this book Stem Cells, Craniofacial Development and Regeneration is an introduction to stem cells with an emphasis on their role in craniofacial development. Section I covers embryonic and adult stem cells with a focus on the craniofacial region, while sections II-IV cover the development and regeneration of craniofacial bone, tooth, temporomandibular joint, salivary glands and muscle.

Author Bios George T. Free Access. Summary PDF Request permissions. Tools Get online access For authors. Email or Customer ID. Conventional MSCs contain various types of cells within adherent culture, resulting in contamination of the MSCs with other cell lineages. Moreover, MSCs show great differences in characteristics between long bones and craniofacial tissue, and these differences should be evaluated in detail in future studies.

Sufficient quantities of purified MSCs from adult tissues for reconstruction of large spaces in the craniofacial region are difficult to collect. Human iPSC technology may be used to overcome this problem. Furthermore, more analyses of MSCs, NCCs, SSCs, and iPSCs are required based on a developmental biological approach, which will be expected to provide evidence-based methods for the treatment of various craniofacial diseases.

The authors thank the members of their laboratory for helpful discussions. Hideyuki Okano is a paid scientific advisor of San Bio Co.


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The other authors have no conflict of interests to declare. Satoru Morikawa and Takehito Ouchi contributed equally to this work. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Journal List Stem Cells Int v. Stem Cells Int. Published online Feb Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Received Dec 11; Accepted Feb 2. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Abstract Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. Introduction Developmental origins are beginning to be elucidated through rigorous studies in stem cell biology. Stem Cells in Craniofacial Research Skeletal tissues are composed of a network of hard tissues, including bone and cartilage.

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Stem Cells, Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

Figure 1. Application of Human MSCs in Craniofacial Research Craniofacial connective tissues originate from neural crest-derived ectomesenchyme, which is a source of many craniofacial bone and cartilage structures. Conclusion Skeletal tissues are composed of bone, cartilage, and tendon. Acknowledgments The authors thank the members of their laboratory for helpful discussions.

References 1. Friedenstein A. Precursors for fibroblasts in different populations of hematopoietic cells as detected by the in vitro colony assay method. Experimental Hematology. Pittenger M. Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells. Chai Y. Fate of the mammalian cranial neural crest during tooth and mandibular morphogenesis. Hagiwara K. Molecular and cellular features of murine craniofacial and trunk neural crest cells as stem cell-like cells.

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Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Craniofacial Regeneration

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Morrison S. Prospective identification, isolation by flow cytometry, and in vivo self-renewal of multipotent mammalian neural crest stem cells. Morikawa S. Development of mesenchymal stem cells partially originate from the neural crest. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. Arthur A. Adult human dental pulp stem cells differentiate toward functionally active neurons under appropriate environmental cues.

Janeczek Portalska K. Endothelial differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells. Silva G. Mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into an endothelial phenotype, enhance vascular density, and improve heart function in a canine chronic ischemia model. Oswald J. Mesenchymal stem cells can be differentiated into endothelial cells in vitro. Takebe T. Vascularized and complex organ buds from diverse tissues via mesenchymal cell-driven condensation.

Cell Stem Cell. Vascularized and functional human liver from an iPSC-derived organ bud transplant. Kobayashia S. Transient vascularization of transplanted human adult-derived progenitors promotes self-organizing cartilage. The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Chan C. Identification and specification of the mouse skeletal stem cell. Worthley D. Gremlin 1 identifies a skeletal stem cell with bone, cartilage, and reticular stromal potential. Fukuda T. Sema3A regulates bone-mass accrual through sensory innervations. Tamaki T. Functional recovery of damaged skeletal muscle through synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis by muscle-derived stem cells.

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Wilkie A. Genetics of craniofacial development and malformation. Nature Reviews Genetics. Takashima Y. Neuroepithelial cells supply an initial transient wave of MSC differentiation. Nagoshi N.

Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

Ontogeny and multipotency of neural crest-derived stem cells in mouse bone marrow, dorsal root ganglia, and whisker pad. Fukuta M. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from pluripotent stem cells through a neural crest lineage using small molecule compounds with defined media. Isern J. The neural crest is a source of mesenchymal stem cells with specialized hematopoietic stem cell niche function. Kohyama J. Tondreau T. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. BMC Genomics.

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Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine. De Berdt P. Dental apical papilla as therapy for spinal cord injury. Journal of Dental Research. Sakai K. Human dental pulp-derived stem cells promote locomotor recovery after complete transection of the rat spinal cord by multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms.

Yamaguchi S. Dental pulp-derived stem cell conditioned medium reduces cardiac injury following ischemia-reperfusion. Scientific Reports. Osugi M. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stem cells enhanced bone regeneration in rat calvarial bone defects.

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Tissue Engineering Part A. Santagati F. Temporal requirement of Hoxa2 in cranial neural crest skeletal morphogenesis. Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration. Huang , Irma Thesleff. Stem Cells, Craniofacial Development and Regeneration is an introduction to stem cells with an emphasis on their role in craniofacial development. Divided into five sections, chapters build from basic introductory information on the definition and characteristics of stem cells to more indepth explorations of their role in craniofacial development. Section I covers embryonic and adult stem cells with a focus on the craniofacial region, while sections II-IV cover the development and regeneration of craniofacial bone, tooth, temporomandibular joint, salivary glands and muscle.

Concluding chapters describe the current, cutting-edge research utilizing stem cells for craniofacial tissue bioengineering to treat lost or damaged tissue. Cranial neural crest cells in craniofacial tissues. Craniofacial lntramembranous bone. Temporomandibular Joint Development. Craniofacial muscle development.



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