Beading with Gemstones: Beautiful Jewelry, Simple Techniques (Lark Jewelry Book)

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Pick up one bead. Stitch down into the next edge bead, stav ing on the back side. This bead is referred to as the picot bead. To determine the numlK'r ol beads to add lor your specific cabochon and design, you will need to add some Ixads and test for the number it takes to produce a loop like the one in the illustration figure 14 that extends from the first picot bead to die third picot bead.

Add the beads and pass the needle through the third picot bead. In other words, skip the second picot bead and pass through the next, or third, picot bead. Add the beads and continue around the cabo- chon, skijiping every rither picot bead and passing through the next picot bead.

End by stitching dowm through the edge bead. Stitch up through the edge bead and through the picot bead. Start under the previ- ous. Stitch down through the next edge bead and to the back side. Tie a knot, weave in the ends, and cut, Add needles to the tail threads, stitch the end. You can also add beads into the tw ist strand for interest, as in the c:ab K:hon on the right.

Try using dilTerent colors of beads for the twist strands for another interesting design look. Or use the twisted edge to surround multiple cabochons, as in the middle necklace. The outside of the has the same iKad and-thread pattern as if r. Insert the needle through the backings from the back side, approximately Vi6 inch 1. Stitch the thread around the loop two beads over to the left, and stitch back up through the sec ond added bead figure Repeat steps 6 and 7 so that there is a total of four beads added on top ol the basic edge.

The final row' is one bead w ide. Pick up one bead and stitch down through the next bead under- neath, changing direction. Stitch across and up through the beads again figure Now Stitch down through all the added rows to the edge beads. Use a running stitch see the side- bar to move your needle to the next empty edge bead to start the next point.

To finish, stitch down to the backings, tie a knot, weave the ends in, and cut the thread. Variations: You can change the size of the star points or mix them in with pointed -edge stitches for a variety of designs. This is the stitch to uae to get to that spot. The subsequent rows are normal brick stitch. When creating a necklace w ith a ruftled-edge calxjchon, use the back side bead method see chapter four to attach the necklace so that the design of the rufllc is not interrupted.

Threatl a needle with approximately 2 yards 1. Insert the needle through the backings from the back side, approximately inch 1. To start the first row, pick up two beads. Stitch around the next thread loop, and stitch back up through the added bead figure Stitch around the next thread loop, and then stitch back up through the added bead. Repeat steps 6 through 1 3 until the row is complete. In other words, repeat steps 4 through 1 5. For the third and subseejuent rows, do standard brick stitch; do not double up. Optional: For the final row, you can use the stan- dard brick stitch as in the instructions above, or use the picot edge variation discussed in chapter two page 21 , Fie a knot, weave in the end, and c:ut the thread.

Add a needle on the tail thread. Tie a knot, weave in the end, and cut the thread. You can make a smoother, less pronounced rufile by doubling up every fourth stitch, or make it fuller by doubling up every second. The illustra- show this etlgc stitch with a lop bail attachment; see chapter four. Use a needle to attach a center bead tern p rarily to any bead in the basic edge figure Use the same count from the cen- ter bead out to the left and insert another needle in that bead figure Calculate the number of scallops and their spacing based on the count you just deter- mined and the total number of edge beads around the cabochon.

Thread a needle with approximately 3 yards 2. Move the side needles as necessary to pnxluce that gap on each side figure Pick up a center beatl and a seed bead. Stitch back dtiwn through the center bead and edge bead to the back. Now count the number of edge beads in the sec- tion, including the bead. Remove all figure 29 6. You should be using the same number for the first and second halves of the loop.

Then stitch down through the to the back side. To finish the edge, stitch through the hackings to the back side. Variation: One variation you may want to try is simply to pick up the accent bead within the loop figure Ikisic beaded cabochons are perfect for all kinds of beaded fringe styles, and fringes are one of the easiest edge tech- nicjues to do. The instructions Udow are for standard straight fringe applied only on the bottom portion of the cabochon. The length and numbt'r of fringe strands, and the size and number of beads in each one, is uji to you.

You can also use other beadwork fringe technicjues, such as branch or twisted refer to any good general beading book for details on lho. Pull the thread : J Yards 2. LVng the thread and needle on the back side of cabochon, stitch down through the center bead. Pick up beads for the fringe according to your design, ending with a turn bead. Stitch back up through the Iringe beads except for the turn bcatl.

Stitch up through the edge bead, staying on the back side. Stitch up through the backings to the top side approximately Vi6 inch 1. Stitch over to the next edge beat! Pass the needle through the etlge bead, Repeat steps 4 through 9 until all tringes on the side are done. Pick up the other needle ami threat!.

Stitch over to the next edge bead down through the backings from the top sitle to the back side approximately inch 1. Repeat steps 4 through 9 until ail fringes on the side arc done. Sometimes, choosing a method of attachment for a particular piece is purely a matter of design preference.

In other cases, there arc practical issues that dictate using one method over another. For example, ij the necklace section will he a string of large, chunky beads, it would he inappropriate to use the direct attachment method the first approach described in this chapter , because the cahochon would be If ted out from the body by the beads and would nor lie properly. For instance, large or heavy cahochons need to he attached using a method that will easily hold the weight.

I the same time, even though a particular method may hold the weight, your design will be more visually appealing fthe method also has a hold, sturdy appearance. Likewise, small, delicate cahochons need to be balanced with delicate designs and attachment methods,. You simply string the neck- bracelet, etc. For example, points for a choker could be on the sides cabochon. Start from the end where the finding will be attached. This is referred to as a stop head because it stops the other beads Irom falling olF the thread as you work.

Stitch back up through the edge bead from the back side, anti continue through all the beads in the strand to the stop bead figure 2. Remove the loop from the stop bead and pass die needle through the bead. Adjust the position of the beads to get the prop er ten. Use the needle end and the tail thread to tie a square knot. Put a needle on the tail thread and stitch 2 or 3 inches 5. Pull on the threads to move the knot into the bead that was the stop bead. Prim all the ends dose to the beads in the. This method is also perfect for multistrand.

Select two or more beads to sew onto the beaded cabochon edge. Determine the position of the added kads at the center of the cabochon edge beads. Ssxch down tlirough the edge bead that is on the r edge on the other side of the aflded beads, i the top side of the beaded cabochon. Repeat step 9 until you arc at the end of the added beatls. Repeat the entire process from step 6 through step Tie a square knot in the tail thread. Weave the ends into the backings and cut. The technique calls for sewing some beads onto the back side of the beaded cabochon.

The pendant is then strung onto the necklace through the holes in those beads. The beaded cabochon is lifted out from the body by the beads in the back. Ac cordingly, this method is esjK'cially appro- priate when the edge creates some depth, such as with ruffled or branch fringe edges. Select two or more beads to sew onto the back of the headed eabochon. However, since this adds depth onto the back, select small heads. Determine the position of the added Isejds on the hack side of the beaded cahochon. The position needs to be in from the top edge of the outer back- ing toward the center, but close enough to the edge to allow the necxllc to go through the backings w ithout running into the calsochon.

Trom the back. U-avc a tail approximately 9 inches Without interfering with the beadwork on the top side of the beaded cabochon, stitch over ami bring the needle back down through the backings to the back side at the point where you want the kst added bead. Add the beads onto the neetlle; thread and stitch them down into place, bringing the needle to the lop side.

Sew each of the added beads onto the back side, stitching through the backings Ifom die lop side to the back side figure 7. When stitching on the top side, be careful that you do not interfere with the beadwork there. Finally, bring the needle and thread to the back side near the tail. Tie a. Weave the ends into the backing and cut them. The top bail ladder - 'thod is particularly appropriate for those - because the strip, or bail, that it creates pro- hinge -like mechanism that ensures that both in the necklace and the pendant will lie against the body.

When the instructions call for f ls, just substitute the number of beads in Ml vou want for your tlesign. Thread each length onto its own neetllc; this method is vvorketl double- thread, so move the needles to the centers to pro- duce double strands. With one of the two needles, stitch up from the back side through the backings to the lop side.

Insert the needle below the edge bead that is under the spacing for the bead row to be added. Leave a tail approximately 9 inches Stitch up through the edge bead blue, figure 8. Repeat step 2 with the other thread on the other side red, figure 8. Position the beads to lie on top of the beads in the previous row. Take the other needle and stitch through the three kads just added red, figure 8.

It is wise to test that the bail will lit over the beads you intend to use for your neck- lace before you finish the bail. To complete the loop for the bail, take one of the needles and stitc h through the beads in the second added row. Repeat on the other side with the other needle. Pull on the tlireads to create the bail loop. Then, using one needle, stitch down to the first row, but only to the middle bead, not all the wav through the row. From the front side, stitch down into the edge bead. Stitch into the backings to bring the needle to the back side figure Repeat on the other side.

On the back side, tie a square knot with the thread in the two needles. Weave the ends into the backing and tut the threads. Thread needles onto the tail ends, tie a square knot on each side, weave in the ends, and cm. H large enough to lit over all the beads, you. Simply create the strip as long as needed for the ring size. Instead of looping the strip around to create a hail, attach the end of the strip to the other side of the cahochon to create the ring.

The instructions are for a six -bead wide loop, three on each sule. These instructions also assume that the center is between two heads on the top. The numl cr of loops to use is a design decision and can he two or more; just alter the instructions below as needed to create the number of loops you want for your project. Thread a needle with approximately i yards 2.

From the back side, stitch up through the Iwck- ings, leaving a tail approximately 9 inchc's Stitch up through the right-center edge bead. T hen stitch across to the Ofth bead from the center to bring the needle to the top. Stitch up through the fifth k-ad figure 1 1. Pick up 2 1 beads and stitch dow n through the edge k-ad that is second from the center, staj-ing on the top side.

Be carchil to position the loop so that it is out- side and in front of tk- previous hxip. SUtch down thniugh the kckings to the kck side approximately At. This will help you keep die loops ositioned cxirrcctly. Stitch up through tk third kad figure Pick up 22 beads and stitch down through the edge bead that is sixth from the cenicr, staying on the lop side.

Stitch down through the backings to the back side approximately Vi6 inch 1. Fmallv, bring the needle through to the back side rttne the tail thread. Tie the ends with a square knot; them into the backings, and cnit. If the center point lAb at a bead rather than between two beads, you BBi still use this method by allowing the first loops Ik each side to share five beads figure You can also vary the number of beads in adjacent loops.

For example, you might make the first loop 1 8 beads, the second loop 2 1 beads, and the third loop 24 beads. This will create a deeper V-shape profile for the loops. Although the bezel technique used for the basic beaded cabochon works for most cabochons, other stitches can he used too, cither as deconn ive features or to solve problems resulting from an unimual slope on the cabochon. But cabochons with a fat edge. Some cabochons, however, arc cut w ith an edge that is not evenly sloped.

This is particularly true for most glass cabochons, due to the nature of glass when it melts. The simplest. By using large beads in that outside row, you can easily raise the bezel row. T hicker edges may require a 4 mm or even a 6 mm bead. The bead size to u. Of course, using larger beads around the cabo- chon can present its own set of problems.

However, if you use a larger bead or a bead that is uniform in shape, such as a 4 mm round, you may not be able to get a good fit around the calx chon with the standard four-six backstitch. You can solve the problem by using a different stitch to apply the beads so that you can manipulate the fit around the cabochon more easily. This stitch IS called the couch. This allows you to add or subtract beads as needed to obtain a bal- anced, even spacing. The beads should fit next to the cabochon edge w ithout a gap. If you have a gap, undo the loop, remove or add a bead or beads as necessary, and try again.

This can he a loose fit as long as there are no big gaps between the Ix'ads in the strand. Once you ve determined the correct number of beads in the strand, stitch through the entire strand again so there are at least two threads in the entire loop figure 1. End by stitching down through the under backing to the back side. Tie a knot. Use your fingers to move the beads around to the proper spacing. Stitch one couch stitch at six o clock, directly opposite from w here you. Now stitch down into the under backing, looping over the thread between the beads. The needle should enter near the edge of the cabochon.

Pull the thread so that the loop rests on top of the thread between the beads. Make sure you move beads as necessary to place the stitches in the positions. Move the beads within the quarter as to provide an even spacing. Tic a knot, weave in the end, and cut the thread, Then thread a needle on the tail thread, tic a knot, weave in the end, and cut.

Essentially, you create small fringe's that stand up from the rou of beads around the cahochon the base row , and then join them together iLsing liu-n beads at the ends of the fringe. You can create a variet y of designs by changing the length of the fringe strands, the sizes and colors of the bead. One method is to use the head count on the base row already applied ai'ound the calxx:hon.

You can count those beads and use a numlxr that divides evenly into it to space the fringes.

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You can adjust this a. If you closed vyith two bead. If you closed by a differc'nt count, simply adjust one or more of the yy indoyy s to make up the dilTerence. You can space the [X sitions evenly or create an uneven design. If the holes in that bead row arc already so that it is too dillicult to pass a nectlle and through them, simply stitch down into the backing instead.

I lold the turn bead one hand and pull on the thread with the other vlyust the tension. The fringe shouhi sit comfort - on the previous bead row. Do not pull so light the fringe flares out. Pick up the number of beads determined in step 6. Sometimes, vou may need to adjust this numbe r between anv two particular fringe points by adding or leaving oil one bead. Stitch through the next fringe figure 5. Repeat step 7 around the caboc:hon figure 6. Stitch around and around until the holes of the beads are filled with thread, rhis will strengthen the row and make the beads line up properly next to each other.

Stitch up through the Bkiner beads, including the end turn bead. Make sure the fringes are lying straight, Hnd near a fringe. Stitch dow n through the fringe and through the under backing. But it also creates a delicate, lacy look, with tiny prongs of beads holding the row. I he instructions below use a spacing of everv four beads of the bead row previously applied. Note that the instructions say to stitch through the holes in the bead row previously applied. If the holes in that bead row are already filled so that it is too dilTicult to pass a needle and thread through them, simply stitch down into the under backing instead.

Thread a needle wiUi approximately I yard. Insert the needle through two beads ol the base row. Pick up three beads, and create the picot by stitching back though the last of the two beads in the base row and then four more beads in that row figure 7. Stitch down through the beads anti the backing to the back side. Thread a needle on the tail thread. I hread a needle with approximately 1 yards 1.

Stitch though the top bead on one ol the picots. Pull the thread so that the bead rests on top of the picot and the tail thread is approximately 9 inches Finally, stitch back up through the added bead figure 8. Make sure the picots are lying straight up, and lest the number of beads needed. Pick up the number of beads determined in step 9, Sometimes, you may need to adjust this number bv adding or leaving oil one bead. Make these adjustments as needed so that the picots stand straight up and the row is lying properly on the cabochon.

Stitch down through the top picot bead and up through the last atlded bead to create a loop figure 9. Pull tightly to adjust the tension. Repeat step 10 around the calxKhon. This w ill strengthen the row and make the beads line up properly next to each other.

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Fnd near a picot. Stitch down through the picot beads and the under backing to the back side. Use the instructions for the picot Ik'zcI, except when creating the picots, pick up four beads instead of three, and stitch back down through the first added bead figure Adtl the top bezel row the same a. Now its time to apply what you've learned and start beading some beautiful cabochon jewelry. All of the projects on the following pages are designed not only to create stunning pieces for you to wear or to give as gifts, but also to help you develop your skills.

Choose a project, read the instructions, gather together the necessary materials, and jump right into the beading. Remember that patience and practice are always the key.

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And you'll he ready to explore the unlimited territory of de. By using large beads in the base row, you create a foundation for a raised bezel that emphasizes the cabochon s entrancing depth and sparkle. This will result in an elevation of the bezel row and compensate for the fat edge. See chapter five, page 61 , Ibr more about bead-rai.

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Using the lop loop attachment instructions on page 57, create the top loops for attaching the necklace. Experiment with different combinations of bead colors and shapes. Try different lengths. Once you've settled on a length and a design, decide on the angle you want for the fringes. If you decrease the seed beads by two for every succeeding fringe from the center, the angle will be gentle. Decreasing by three, four, or five seed beads will cre- ate a sharper angle.

Thread a needle with approximately 6 yard. Starting at the Ixitlom center from die back side, stitch up thniugh tlie backings to the lop side just above he center edge Ivad, U'lween die edge row and the outer row. Stitch down through the center edge liead. Then pul a beading needle on the other 3 yards 2. Using the pointed edge method in. As you complete tlie edge on each side, tie a knot in the tfu-ead strand, weave in the end, and cut.

Thread a needle with approximately 4 yards 3. Move the beads lo the end of the thread, leaving a tail of approximately 9 inches Go through the beads again to create a loop. Repeat step B 17 more times. AR finish E. Repeat step D two more limes. One 6 mm copper- lined transparent round bead, one 5 mm Capri blue biconc bead, one 3x6 mm black faceted wafer bead, and one' 8 mm black faceted fire- polished round bead G.

Repeat steps D through F. Pick up eight size 9" round seed beads, teal. Repeal steps. A through G, in reverse order and starting with the bead listed last in each step, to be ad the other side of the strand. Jo through the beads again to create a loop. Pull the thread to adjust the tension of the strand.

Stitch back thiough all ol the beads in the neck- lace strand. This will result in a total of bur threads in the strand, giving it btKlv and strength. Make Matching Earrings You can easily make earrings to match your necklace. Just slip a few of the same beads you used in the fringe onto a pair of gold 2-inch s.

After you've added the beads, use round-nose pliers to bend the "open" end of each headpin into a loop. Attach dangle wires or other earring findings to the loops. The turned bead edge serves two important functions: It provides a decorative frame for the cabochon, and it also makes the bracelet stronger. Whichever is the case, make center beed figure 1 to have an uneven count, on sure that each side is the same; in other words, il the center is between two beads on one side, use a between-beads cen- ter on the other side too. To accomplish this, you may need the top versus the hot tom, of edge beads between the centers.

Sec figure 3. Pick up one 4 mm dark metallic gray faceted fire polished bead and one 6x8 mm rhodonite tube bead. Move the beads toward the loop created in step 2. Then add one final 4 mm dark metallic gray faceted fire polished bead. Stitch through the edge bead two beads up Irom the center beads, staying on the lop side ol the backings figure 4.

After you stitch hack through all the bracelet iKads, you will return to the loop created in step 2. Tie the tail and needle-end threads with a square knot. VWave in the ends and cut. Finally, stitch over to the back side near the original starting place. Tic the tail and needle-end threads with a stjuare knot. Weave in the ends and cut. Repeat steps 2 through 8 to create the other side ol the bracelet. Thread a needle with approximately 1 'A yards 1.

Stitch up from the back side U the top " side between the edge row and the base row and through an c. Jge bead that is near the bottom of the cabiK-hon figure 6. When you near the bracelet attachment, go through the seed In-ads u. Use two silver jump rings on each loop to attach the cla. Combining a variety of special techniques produces a spectacularly beaded cabochon; placing it on a simple strand of alternating beads emphasizes its regal appearance. Space the windows along the base row everv two Ixads. See illustrations 4 and 5 in chapter five, page See the instructions for optional step H in chapter two, page Thread a needle with 2 yards 7.

Tie the threads with a square knot, weave in the ends, and cut. Move the bead to the end of the thread and 78 A. Repeal step A 10 more times so that you vc strung a total oF 1 1 pairs of beads. Stitch back through all the beads in the necklace strand to the sUrting point. Remove the loop thread from the stop bead and stitch through that bead.

Pull the thread to adjust the tension oF the strand. Tie the thread. Use two jump rings through each end loop to attach the hook clasp at one end and the eye portion oFthe clasp at the other end. You're done! Then Follow steps A through E Inflow, picking up beads as indi- cated, to string the necklace strand show n or, oF course, you can design your own. Combining cabochons and the ladder stitch gives you almost unlimited versatility for bracelet designs.

For this design, each center needs to be between two beads, not through a head. Now, starting with the First edge bead after a marked bead, count around the edge 14 beads. The next two edge beads should be the center beads on the other side. Hut a needle in each of these two beads to mark them temporarily. In this project, the total on each side between the pairs of center heads should be I hread a needle with approxi mately 2 yards 1. Stitch up through the backings Irom the back side to the bead- ed cabochon top. Filter two beads over Irom the cen- ter beads, IxHvvcen the base row and the edge bead row.

Stitch up through that edge bead. Leave a tail on the back side of approximately 9 inches Repeat the stitching in step 3, except enter two beads over from the other side of the center beads. With the other needle, pick up three. Go through the same l-ieads again to create a loop. With the other needle, go through the loop again, but enter from the side opposite that used by the other thread.

Pull and adjust the thread to the proper tension. Tic the two threads together with a square knot. Stitch all the way back to the cabfxhon. Then stitch down to the back side. Tic a square knot on each side using the needle- end threads and tail threads on each side. Thread a needle with approximately 1 yard. From the back side, stitch up to the top side next to an edge bead near the bracelet ladder. Using the pointed edge method instructions on page 29, add points to the edge until you reach the bracelet ladder on the opposite side.

Then use small up-and-down stitches through the backing, stitching between the edge row and the base row, until you get past the bracelet ladder. Stitch over to the tail thread and tie a square knot. Use one jump ring to attach the clasp to one end and two jump rings side by side to attach the chain to the other end. Put one 6 mm round unakite bead on the headpin. Using the pliers, bend that portion into a loop over the chain end.

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Because the round cabochons are so small, the base row also serves as a bezel row to hold the stones in place. Using the oval unakilc cabochons, create basic beaded cabochons by following the instructions in chapter two page 1 5 through step 6. Because the 8 mm round cabochons are so small, the base row will do double duty and also act as the bezel row. Be sure to select cabochons that not only are the same size in diameter but that also have the same dome height and slope. Once the beads are sewn on. Por the same reason, it's important to keep track of the number of beads you use in each of the rows on the first cabochon you make so that you can duplicate your work on the other cabochon, Por the base and bezel rows, simply use the same number of beads for each row on the second cabochon that you used on the first.

When applying the edge row, use the bead count on the base row as a guide. Count the beads to verify. Match up one round cabochon with an oval cabochon for one of the car- rings. Match up the other round uith the other oval for the second earring. Then align the center beads on the bottom of the round cabochon with the center bead.

Stitch through the center edge bead on the oval cabochon. Stitch through the center edge bead on the round cabochon, staving on the back side of the backings. Pull the thread until the edge Kads on both cabo- chons meet; leave a tail on the oval cabochon of approximately 9 inches Stitch up through the backings to the top side of the round cabochon, just above the center edge bead, between the base row and the edge row. Slay on the back side of the backings. Stitch up to the top side of the oval cabochon above the center bead between the base row and the edge row.

Stitch over to the first center bead by stitching dowm to the back side between the base row and the edge row. Repeat steps 4 through 14 for the second earring. Thread a needle with approximately 2 yards T. Then fol- low the instructions for atUching dangle earring findings on page 1 19, starting w ith step 2 and end- ing with step 1 1. Do not tie the thread once the hops are done. Using the same thread that you used in step 16, start the edge stitching next to the loop you just made, follow ing the instructions for the pointed 86 edge method in chapter three, page W hen you reach the Continue adding heads down the oval cabochon using the pointed edge stitch.

When vou near the bot- tom center, create the drop -bead Fringe. Depending on your edge bead count, there will be one or two edge beads between the two connecting points for the fringe loop and the bottom center edge bead refer to the project photo. Pull the thread to adjust the tension. Stitch up to the top side between the base row and the edge row, just above the edge bead.

Continue stitching on the pointed edge, back to die top, duplicating on this side the same pattern created on the first side. Use a running. Tie the threads w idi a sejuare knot, weave in the ends, and cut. The simple but elegant picot bezel creates lacy windows that embellish the cabochon without covering it. Next, create the tw isted edge, follow ing the instructions in chapter three, beginning on page Remember that this tvpe of edge technique calls for a repeating pattern. You can then make the tw ists longer or shorter in that area to compensate without com- promising vour design.

When you complete the twisted strands, tie the ends w ith a square not but do not weave in and cut the thread. The attachment For this design requires only nvo turn beads. Thread a needle wiili approximately 4 yard. Move the bead. A through J below, picking up beads as indicated, to string the necklace strand sliown or, oF course, you can design vour own. One 4 mm opacjue black round bead and one 6 mm tiger jasper round bead C.

Repeat step B. One 4 mm opaque black round bead, one 8 mm leopardskin jasper round bead, and one 4 mm opaque black round bead E. One 8 mm tiger jasper round bead F. Repeat steps D and li six more times. Repeat step D. Stitch through the turn beads on the beaded cabochon. Repeat steps A through H, in reverse order and starting with the btad listed last in each step, to bead the other side oF the strand. Stitch through the beads again to create a loop. Stitch back through ail the beads in the necklace strand. When you reach the end loop you created when you started stringing, tie the thread.

Use two jump rings through each end loop to attach the hook clasp at one end and the chain at the other end. Place one 8 mm tiger jasper round bead, and then one 4 mm opaque black round bead, onto the headpin. Then, with the pliers, bend the open end ol tJie headpin into a loop through the last link in the chain. Using the permanent marker, color the under backing black so that it w ill not contrast with the cabochon and beads. Using the black onyx cabochon, create a basic beaded cabochon by following the instructions in chapter two page 1 5 through step 3.

Then trim the under backing as described in part A of chapter two s step 4 page 1 9. Do not on to attach the outer hacking j'et. Be sure to apply the piece of plasUc, as directed, over the find- ing pad to reinforce the attachment. Now, by following the instructions starling on page 41 , create the pin s scalloped edge. Start the process near the bottom of the pin. Continue stitching scallops around the edge.

As you near the starting point at the bottom, deter- mine how many edge beads w ill be left after the last scallop. There are three possibilities. The num- IxT of edge beads left can be one, two, or three. Add a fringe strand to each of the empty edge beads. If there is only one edge bead left and you want a fuller fringe, use a branch fringe technique as show n in the photo. See chapter three, page 44, for instructions on how to attach fringe.

Thread a needle w ith approximately 2 yards 1,83 m of thread this technique is worked single- thread. Take one of the cabochons and stitch up through the backings from the back side to the top side, stitching between the base row and the edge row ; leave a tail of approximately 9 inches Stitch out through the edge bead. Stitch through the edge bead ol a second cabochon, staying on the top side. Stitch down through the backings to die back side. Stay on the top side when stitching through the edge bead. Now stitch down through the backings to the back side figure 1.

Following the instructions for the pointed erlge method in chapter three, page 29, stitch on two edge X ints. Skip the next edge bead by sewing past it, using a running. Then, following the instructions for the turn bead attachment method in c hapter four, page 50, apply three added beads over the next bur edge beads to create a turn bead attach- ment.

Skip the next edge bead again, sew past it, using a running stitch. Stitch on two cxlge point.


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Skip the next edge Ixad. Skip the next edge bead and finish the circle w ith two more edge points figure 2. The tail thread is here. Tie the thread ends w ith a square knot. Using a needle on the tail thread, weave in the end and cut. Stitch back through the 5 mm amethvst round bead and 4 mm Bali silver round bead to the other cabochon. Repeat step 4 to create the edge on this second c'abochon. Again using a running stitch, stitch over to the bead directly opposite 1 5 edge beads over.

Stitch through the edge bead. Stitch through the backings to the back side. Stitch through the backings to the back side, Stitch back up through that edge bead, and back through the amethyst and Bali silver lieads, to the third cahochon. This will make a total ol three threads through the amethyst and Bali silver beads. Now stitch from the top side down through the backings to the back side. The cabochons should lie even and straight.

Repeat step 4 on the third cahochon. Stitch to the back side. Thread a needle with approximately 2 yanls 1. I have managed to fire silver over bronze and bronze over silver and my solutions are all presented in this book. Over 45 step-by-step projects, pages, full color, soft cover, spiral bound. The first edition of this book was sold out in less than three years.

Since a lot has happened in the field of metal clay since then, this second edition has been revised and expanded to accommodate these changes. It is suitable for beginners and advanced users of both precious and base metal clay. This comprehensive text is clearly the ultimate word on metal clay, particularly as it is used in the creation of rings. Over photos illustrate the tools, pro- cesses, and stunning results available to aspiring artists.

The instructional text would be a weighty book all by itself, but that text is augmented with 21 projects by the author and scores of rings made by craftspeople from around the world. Check out this video about the book. With the same attention to detail as Helen has demonstrated in her tutorials and magazine projects, the multitude of images helps readers whose first language is not English. A perfectly executed example of how the same technique can create two distinctly different styles, Miech clearly shows how the materials used determine the final look and feel of jewelry.

The 30 beautiful jewelry projects in this book showcase a cool, elegant, classic piece and a fun, fresh, contemporary piece. She is also adding value with three new projects to the book, for a total of 23 great projects. Pendants, rings, necklaces, bracelets, and earrings are made from precious metal clay and combined with gemstones, pearls, crystals, and beads to make beautiful jewelry pieces.

Everybody will jump at this second chance to discover these wonderful designs, all in one book! No metalsmithing required! Easy-to-use metal clay makes the creation of fine silver jewelry possible to a huge audience of crafters and beaders. Metal Clay Rings presents step-by-step instructions for making 18 beautifully designed, wearable rings.

Irina Miech applies techniques from her popular, earlier books to ring making and shares all-new project ideas. You will be amazed by the wide repertoire of skills you can develop as the projects move from easy to challenging. Great book for beginners and the more advanced too. The format of this book allows it to open flat so you can keep it open on your bench while you follow the instructions.

Beading with Cabochons: Simple Techniques for Beautiful Jewelry

It is packed with information about setting all kinds of stones in metal clay. Lots of great illustrations too. Silver metal clay is an accessible, easy to use material that allows unique, hallmark-quality jewellery to be made at home with simple tools. This practical book introduces the various forms of silver metal clay and their relative merits. Packed with images; seventeen step-by-step projects; full instruction and advice, Making Metal Clay Jewellery is an invaluable resource for all jewellers who want to learn and develop their skills with this versatile material.

Modelleras och formas som vanligmodellera. Smycket kan sedan sedan slipas och poleras som vanligt silver. Silverlera och glas. Beginning with an overview of the properties of metal clay, including safety information and metalsmithing terms, this thorough resource offers detailed procedures for creating a variety of components, settings, findings, attachments, 3-D forms, and textured effects.

Creative tips on incorporating beads are also included. This handbook offers jewelry artists the design inspiration needed to create gallery-level pieces that are truly wearable art. Illustrated with easy-to-follow color instructions, the book covers the basics of working with metal clay, along with info on necessary tools, firing and drying schedules, torch and stove-top firing, online resources, and much more. Beaders eager to add metal clay to their arsenal of crafting techniques will find this second entry in the for Beaders series perfectly designed to meet their needs.

Kristal Wick, one of the best names in craft jewelry, explains how to use copper, silver, and bronze metal clay to create simple customized embellishments, findings that match their beads, and a variety of spacers, bead caps, dangles, and links. In addition to the basics of forming, firing, and finishing the clay, more than 20 inspiring projects combine metal clay components with gorgeous beads. Precious metal clay PMC is an innovative material that combines the workability of clay with the beautiful finish and durability of precious metals. The material is easy to manipulate and shape by hand to make beads for bracelets, necklaces, and other jewelry.

This book contains fifteen projects for creating fine silver beads and a design gallery of 25 additional jewelry pieces. Intro chapters include information about tools and techniques. Projects are organized workshop-style, to build skills cumulatively. Design principles are applied and illustrated to help you learn to think like a designer and respond to what is inherently offered in the stone.

The goal is to create harmony and unity between the stone and the metal setting. Great beginners book covering all the basic techniques with clear instructions. Projects are well illustrated and easy to follow. This book comes highly recommended for anyone interested in making their jewelry hobby into a business. We live in a hurry-up world-so busy crafters will find these quick, inventive ideas for creating spectacular jewelry a godsend.

Showcasing everything from pink pearls and sterling silver to nontraditional and repurposed materials, these varied projects are fresh, fantastic, and fun. Twenty top designers are working with all kinds of metal clay, various forms of silver, bronze, and copper, and adding different elements to add color to the projects.

The 25 projects in this book include color with polymer clay, colored ceramics, patinas, resin, gemstones, seed beads, enamel, and more. All techniques are presented with step-by-step instructions and photographs. These well recognized contributors bring an eye-candy appeal to metal!

Boasting all the same properties as modelling clay, it is This handy new book is perfect for anyone taking their first steps with this rewarding craft. Get stuck in to the varied series of 22 projects that show perfectly the versatility of silver clay. Shape, roll, cut, mould and indent your way through them, learning the basics as you go with the help of a jargon-free techniques section.

From pendants and bracelets to rings and statement beads, there will be something for everyone. Fine Silver By Hand is a compact 72 page book to slip into the toolbox of those new to metal clay. Illustrated with hundreds of color photos and filled with concise information, the book introduces the easiest way to work with fine silver using only handtools and portable firing methods no electricity needed! The techniques, materials and tools are all presented for anyone with no jewelry experience. See diynet. Detailed information on techniques, suppliers, resources and websites are also included.

Projects range from simple, easy to make jewellery aimed at the complete beginner, to more complex projects that will challenge anyone who already has experience of working with metal clay. Each project is accompanied by full step-by-step instructions and each step is fully illustrated with beautiful photographs by professional photographer, David Airey. This gorgeous guide to metal clay jewellery, written by jewellery designer Natalia Colman, features silver, copper and bronze clays.

It contains 17 jewellery projects including rings, pendants, earrings, bracelets and decorative clasps: it is thorough enough to lead a beginner through the process from start to finish, but innovative enough to inspire even experienced jewellery-makers. Many of the projects include ideas for adapting the project or producing it in other metals.

Natalia uses the clays in often new and innovative ways, such as using hand-drawn scratch-foam reliefs to create texture, oven-bake enamel to create colour, and, for those who like to adapt their jewellery according to their mood, she uses nuts and bolts to create a stunning ring with interchangeable heads. The book also contains a reference section at the back including firing guides for a large range of gemstones, ensuring that the reader is well-equipped to go on to design and make exactly the kind of jewellery they want.

This gorgeous guide to metal clay jewellery, written by jewellery designer Natalia Colman, is innovative, inspiring and easy-to-use. It guides the reader through the process of making 20 animal-themed pieces of jewellery from silver, copper and bronze clay. It features stunning designs incorporating household favourites such as cats, dogs and rabbits, as well as featuring fashion-forward pieces such as a swallow ring, a bull pendant and a swan brooch.

Great book focusing on enameling on metal clay. This is the only book covering this subject and is a basic and comprehensive introduction to enameling. Clear, concise writing and thorough step-by-step photos make rich inspiration for aspiring polymer or metal clay artists. The elegant jewelry pieces laid out here include pendants, necklaces, earrings, bracelets, pins, and charms.

More than 20 sophisticated projects include variations and ideas that showcase each medium at its best. Award winning jewelry designer, metal clay artist and Rio Grande Senior Instructor, Patrik Kusek, shows step-by-step how to create sophisticated, nature-inspired jewelry with metal clay. Plus, readers can find videos of inside information and tips about metal clay and Woodland Chic projects at the Woodland Chic website. Let your personality shine with Pretty Pendants! Each of the pieces featured in this book will bring a bit of bling to your beaded creations. With projects from expert beaders, you will be guided along with step-by-step tutorials that lead to a stunning finished piece, perfect for a necklace, earrings, or even brooch.

No matter your beading fancy, be it wirework or polymer clay, you will find something to love in Pretty Pendants. Celebrate the innovation and creative inspiration of contemporary beadmakers from around the world! This gorgeous volume in the popular Showcase series presents 1, unique beads, all handcrafted from a dazzling array of materials—including glass, polymer clay, ceramics, metal, paper, fiber, plastic, wood, and stone.


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